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    This groundbreaking book, an important contribution to Naomi Mitchison criticism, examines three novels, The Bull Calves<    
    i> (1947), The Big House<    
    i> (1950) and Lobsters on the Agenda<    
    i> (1952), and a selection of short stories, with particular regard to the supernatural, fairy-tale and mythical content which is a recurrent element in her work. Naomi Mitchison (1897-1999) was a highly practical person – a social and political activist, a feminist and a pacifist – yet was drawn to the idea of an ‘irrational’ dimension to life, and reported inexplicable experiences from her childhood onwards. An awareness of the supernatural and mythical pervades her writing. This book shows that Mitchison perceived a strong connection between ‘the irrational’ and questions of creativity, sex and fertility, which she saw as being themselves interconnected and central to her life.

Moira Burgess is a professional writer in the genres of fiction, drama and poetry, and has published widely on Scottish literature and women’s writing.

Dr Burgess is the author of<

   
    i> The Glasgow Novel: A bibliography. Her novels<    
    i> The Day Before Tomorrow and <    
    i>A Rumour of Strangers are shortly to be reprinted by Kennedy & Boyd, and she is working on an edition of Naomi Mitchison’s collected prose.

Like Mitchison, she comes from Kintyre.<

   
    i>    
    This study examines the economic and social consequences for Glasgow of the global crisis of capitalism known as the Great Depression, and how this is represented in five realist novels published during the 1930s. It is argued that the inter-war era was a time of both cultural renaissance and political revolution, and a liminal moment in Glasgow's history, defining economic and social conditions in the city for most of the twentieth century. It was also a significant phase in the development of the narrative of the city, creating a new form of literary representation of Glasgow, and a new genre of urban realism in Scottish literature.    
    There are four reasons for producing this modern edition of Barrie's earliest plays - 'Bandelero the Bandit', Bohemia and 'Caught Napping'.

The first is canonical. Neither of the first two has ever been published while only two copies of 'Caught Napping' can be traced and these date from the year of its composition in 1883.

The second is biographical. After being heralded as a genius in his own day simplistic Freudian links between Barrie and his most famous creation, Peter Pan threatened to turn him into a one-play oddity or, more generally, a naive writer fleeing sentimentally from serious themes and ideas. Although these views have now been critically rejected and Barrie restored to his former central place in the history of British drama, his childhood and youth remain an especially important area of biographical enquiry. While psychological analyses of these early days before Barrie became a London playwright abound there is little by way of literary comment and no printed texts to consult.

These are the gaps which this volume seeks to fill. 'Bandelero', the one-act play he wrote in 1877, while still a pupil at Dumfries Academy, is especially important. The three acts of Bohemia follow and were composed in Edinburgh four years later when Barrie was studying at Edinburgh University. 'Caught Napping' belongs to yet another stage of development and introduces a third geographical setting. He is now a full time journalist on The Nottingham Journal and so it is unsurprising that the short farce is published in the Saturday Supplement to that paper.

The third reason is literary. The critical introductions to these plays demonstrate the many ways in which their form, theatrical techniques and themes anticipate Barrie's later practice. For example, the frequent critical claim that 'Ibsen's Ghost' in 1891 is the first of Barrie's plays to use burlesque conventions implies ignorance of 'Bandelero's heavy reliance on the same conventions ten years earlier. His heavy technical reliance on the visual and aural powers of the theatre is witnessed in all three. Thematically, while studies of women as at once more powerful and more knowledgeable than men will become a leitmotif in Barrie's work, it is usually traced back, at the earliest, to 1891 and Walker, London. Yet clearer models, in Bohemia's Vanity and Jenny in 'Caught Napping' pre-date that work.

The fourth motivation is editorial and is by way of a modest proposal. Now that Barrie has once more 'arrived,' is it not time that fully annotated modern acting editions, reflecting the many changes he made in study and in theatre, might now be offered? The simple editorial task afforded by the single witnesses to each of Barrie's earliest plays may not in itself mirror the complexities of that task but it does, literally, 'open up' the challenge.

   
    What made Burns read, and what impact did his reading choices have on him as a man and a writer? This meticulous and detailed study presents a Burns 'open to different ideas', and 'making use of them in his life and work'. The poet's extensive reading is traced through his family and early education experience, French studies (particularly of Fénelon), and exposure to novels (notably the works of Smollett, Sterne and Mackenzie) and periodicals. A key theme explores Robert Burns in relation to Romanticism. Appendices include a piece on parallels in the work of Diderot and Burns, and a list of the authors and books read by the poet. As Professor Kenneth Simpson says in his Foreword, this is '..original research made readily accessible'.    
    Half a dozen young men find themselves at the end of their university years facing the awful prospect that they must now support themselves. They decide to found an Ideal Commonwealth, in the Navigator Islands - Samoa (where, by a wonderful coincidence, a decade later, Stevenson himself eventually settled and where he died and is buried). Here - they reason - work and money, dreary offices and dreary jobs, will not be known or needed. But capital is required to start even an Ideal Commonwealth. One of their number knows of “a real, glowing, gaudy, old-high treasure” - gold and jewels in a trunk in a family castle in the Scottish Highlands, theirs for the stealing, and . . .

Robert Louis Stevenson began writing the comic novel The Hair Trunk or The Ideal Commonwealth: An Extravaganza<

   
    i> in April or May 1877, when he was twenty-six, and left it unfinished - after 30,000 words, in nine chapters - two years later. It shows a side of him whom most readers have never known existed: a satirical Stevenson making great fun, in a manner worthy of his contemporaries Gilbert and Sullivan, of the events and passions, the personalities and the predicaments, of his day. Previously published only in a French translation, it now takes its rightful place among his memorable early works of fiction. Transcribed, introduced, and annotated by the noted scholar Roger G. Swearingen from Stevenson’s unpublished manuscript (now in the Huntington Library, San Marino, California), this edition reveals glimpses of the author’s developing literary skills and his complex and often madcap personal temperament. The extensive and illustrated annotations are fascinating in themselves, not least for the references to the contemporary late-Victorian scene.

Roger G. Swearingen is best known for his authoritative The Prose Writings of Robert Louis Stevenson: A Guide<

   
    i> (1980); the Stevenson entry in the Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature<    
    i> (2000); a comprehensive review of scholarship on Stevenson, including biographies and editions, published in Dickens Studies Annual<    
Robert Louis Stevenson: Spirit of Adventure,<.htm">    Robert Louis Stevenson: Spirit of Adventure,<.htm">i> (2005-2006); and as the discoverer of Stevenson's first published work of fiction, a long short story called "An Old Song", published anonymously in 1877. A graduate of the University of California-Berkeley and of Yale University, after a first career teaching Victorian Literature, Stevenson, and technical writing at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and the University of California-Davis, he went on to spend more than twenty years in information design for a major electronic measurement company in Northern California. He is currently finishing a full-length biography, Robert Louis Stevenson: Spirit of Adventure,<    
    i> for Faber & Faber.    
    Sir James Barrie's fall from critical grace has been spectacular. Ranked in his own day with Shaw and Hardy, he is now usually dismissed as superficial, sentimental and commercial to the point of artistic dishonesty. Professor Jack argues that the naturalistic, psychological and national criteria used to condemn him are at odds with his proclaimed purposes. Using Barrie's own literary theory as contained in Sentimental Tommy<    
    i> and elsewhere, he measures the playwright against the standards of a perspectival art founded on the perceived needs of its audience. Barrie's thought and theatrical skills are traced through the apprentice works of the Victorian period - Walker, London<    
    i>, The Professor's Love Story<    
    i>,    
       
    www.kennedyandboyd.co.uk    
    biblio    
The Little Minister<.htm">    The Little Minister<.htm">190499962x.htm">The Little Minister<    
    a><    
    i>, The Wedding Guest<    
    i>. Major debts to Shakespeare and to Ibsen are con­sidered in the light of Barrie's intention of becom­ing 'the heaviest writer of his time.' A compulsive reviser and perfectionist, he struggles to find a dramatic form capable of combining pleasing myth with harshest truth. The major plays of 1902-4 are radically reas­sessed and the older claim for Barrie's genius resurrected on new critical grounds. Quality Street is related to the metaphysical clash between Chris­tianity and Darwinism; The Admirable Crichton's many endings are seen - not as a sign of uncer­tainty - but as an anticipation of the deconstructionist's concern with form's defeat by meaning. Little Mary ('the too-too-obvious riddle') is re­vealed in all its allegorical complexity as a biting satire on the Irish problem and the English upper class. Peter Pan ends this stage of Barrie's pil­grimage, drawing his major concerns into the com­prehensive form of a Creation Myth, owing much to Nietzsche and Roget. First published in 1991 and now reprinted with corrections.

R D S Jack, F.R.S.E., F.E.A. is Emeritus Professor of Mediaeval and Scottish Literature at Edinburgh University. His earlier books include <

   
    i>Scottish Prose 1550-1700 (1972); <    
    i>The Italian Influence on Scottish Literature (1972); <    
    i>Scottish Verse 1560-1660 (1978); <    
    i>Alexander Montgomerie (1985); <    
    i>History of Scottish Literature Vol 1 (1988); <    
    i>Patterns of Divine Comedy (1989); <    
    i>William Dunbar (1996),<    
    i> The Mercat Anthology of Early Scottish Literature (2000, with P.A.T. Rozendaal) and <    
    i>Scotland in Europe (2006, with Tom Hubbard).    
    Originally published in 1975, Andrew Hook's Scotland and America<    
    i> is now considered a classic by experts on Scottish and American thought and culture. It is relevant to a number of important topics that have gained increasing attention in the twenty-first century, including the Scottish Enlightenment and its impact; transatlantic studies, and studies of cultural representation and transmission generally; the history of print communication; and the problem of national identity in modern Scottish history. Scotland and America<    
    i> convincingly documents the range and depth of the Scottish imprint on American culture in its formative years.

'Scotland and America is a foundational book in transatlantic literary history. It remains essential reading today for anyone seeking to understand the complexity,extent and nature of Scotland's impact on America in the crucial first century of the new nation's move towards literary independence. Hook's scholarly research, broad sweep of argument and elegant readability make it always a delight to return to. Humming Earth must be congratulated for their enterprise in making this important text available once more.' Susan Manning, Grierson Professor of English Literature,University of Edinburgh<

   
    i>

'Andrew Hook's Scotland and America is a path-breaking book, which has opened up a whole new terrain of scholarly enquiry. Although the primary focus of the book is on literature, the range of erudition makes it essential reading for historians and others as well.' Colin Kidd, Professor of Modern History, University of Glasgow<

   
    i>.

New edition, with a new preface by the author and an up-dated bibliography, and a foreword by Richard Sher.

A Fellow of both the British Academy and the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Andrew Hook is Emeritus Bradley Professor of English Literature at the University of Glasgow. He has recently held visiting appointments at American universities including Princeton and Dartmouth. Among his many publications are a book of essays on the Scottish-American theme, <

   
    i>From Goosecreek to Gandercleugh: Studies in Scottish-American Literary and Cultural History (1999), two books on F. Scott Fitzgerald and editions of works by Sir Walter Scott and Charlotte Bronte.<    
    i>    
    A wide-ranging account of the subtle changes in the portrayal of cousin marriage in 19th Century English Literature, from the early period – in which it was a common practice in the West – through to the century’s end, by which time it was condemned by scientists, including Darwin, and the community at large. The book’s chronological approach takes into account the key biographical facts of the novelists under scrutiny, most of whom are known for their realistic engagement with world issues. It also examines the plots, themes and characters of many novels, rather than concentrating on close readings of a few works. In a final brief foray into the present, the author emphasises the relevance of ‘humanistic studies’ to our lives and attitudes today. <    
    i> Both well-known novelists (Austen, the Brontes, Wilkie Collins, Conrad, Hardy and Trollope among them) and lesser known writers feature; there is a full Bibliography, an Index of Fictional Characters and Place Names, and a general Index.

Jill Felicity Durey is an Associate Professor in English and Writing at Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia. Her previous publications include Realism and Narrative Modality: The Hero and Heroine in Eliot, Tolstoy and Flaubert<

   
    i> (1993), and Trollope and the Church of England<    
    i> (2002).    
    'Thomas Crawford's book is one of the outstanding twentieth century contributions to Burns studies. It combines scholarly erudition with critical passion, and securely places Burns's poetry on the world stage. Casting new light on all the major poetry and song, this book is essential reading for Burns scholars, students, and the non-specialist alike'. - Nigel Leask, Regius Professor of English Language and Literature, University of Glasgow.<    
    i>

Tom Crawford spent the first part of his academic career in New Zealand at the University of Auckland. He returned to Scotland in 1965, and after a brief spell as Lecturer in English at Edinburgh, moved to Aberdeen where he became Senior Lecturer and subsequently Reader in English Literature until his retiral in 1985. He is an outstanding figure among the first generation of scholars who devoted their entire careers to the study of Scottish Literature. His <

   
    i>Burns:a study of the Poems and Songs appeared originally in 1960, while later works include <    
    i>Love, Labour, and Liberty (1976), Society and the Lyric (1980), Boswell, Burns and the French Revolution (1990) and Volume One of The Correspondence of James Boswell and William Johnson Temple 1756-1795 (1997).    
    The life of Sir William Watson Cheyne spanned the flamboyant era of colonial expansion and some of the most important medical developments of the 19th century. His own role in these advances - as an eminent surgeon, an early researcher in medical bacteriology, a staunch ally of Lord Lister, an MP, and an intrepid traveller - has not previously been studied in depth. Fittingly for a man of meticulous detail, yet with a restless and pioneering imagination, his extraordinary story emerges from a fascinating mix of family and community memory and detailed archival research. Added to this resource is the sheer wonder of the digitisation of photographs and glass lantern slides from the family home - whereby faded sepia and scratched surfaces revive the 'ghosts' who took tea on the lawns of Leagarth House or served in the medical units of the Boer War. Many of these rare images are reproduced in the biography.

When the author, then the manager of the museum on the remote Shetland island of Fetlar, first began to research 'Sir Watson' in 1999, she imagined 'in some small way ... restoring him to his rightful place in history'. She has surpassed this, both for readers of biography and for social historians, not only those researching the history of medicine.

Shortlisted for the Saltire Society Scottish Research book of the Year 2015

   
    <    
    b>    
-- Richard B. Sher, Distinguished Professor of History at the New Jersey College of Technology.<.htm">    -- Richard B. Sher, Distinguished Professor of History at the New Jersey College of Technology.<.htm">"Ralph McLean and Humming Earth have made a huge contribution to eighteenth-century Scottish studies by giving us a new edition of John Home's Douglas (long out of print) along with facsimiles of three dozen contemporary broadsides, pamphlets, proclamations, and advertisements relating to the play. These primary sources may well generate a resurgence of interest in Douglas, in Home and his work, in the Scottish stage, in cultural identity as a national and religious issue, in the rise of the two ecclesiastical parties within the Church of Scotland, and in the supporting roles played by prominent figures such as David Hume, Adam Ferguson, and John Witherspoon. "

-- Richard B. Sher, Distinguished Professor of History at the New Jersey College of Technology.<

   
    i>    
    God and the Poets<    
    i> encapsulates many of Daiches's key interests, ranging as it does from the Psalms and the Book of Job to 20th-century Scottish and American poetry. In enquiring into the relationship between poets, poetry and the divinity, Daiches is exploring humanity's creative engagement with spirituality. Beginning with Job's challenge to God, Daiches moves through medieval Hebrew poetry, Dante, Milton, and English, Scottish and American poetry of faith, doubt and denial. In a fascinating and illuminating journey he vividly demonstrates the nature and compass of poetry itself, and its ability to express all humanity's intellectual, psychological and emotional needs. This is a book not only for students of literature and lovers of poetry, but for all those, with or without religious faith, with an interest in fundamental issues of the human condition.

David Daiches (1912-2005) had a distinguished career on both sides of the Atlantic as writer, critic and inspiring teacher. He held posts at the universities of Chicago, Cornell, Cambridge, Sussex and Edinburgh, and published prolifically on a wide range of topics, including Scottish literature and history, British and American poetry and fiction, modernism, literary theory, the Old Testament and Jewish concerns. <

   
    i>

First published in 1984; now with a new Introduction by Jenni Calder.

   
    Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll and 1st Earl of Ilay, lived a long and very active life as soldier, lawyer, politician, patron and businessman. History remembers him on the one-hand as courageous, good-natured, learned and accomplished - and, on the other, as 'a man of little truth, little honour, little principle'. His substantial political career, driven by gaining and increasing his power and that of his friends, is poorly documented, since many of his private papers have vanished. The author's interest in Argyll as a key figure in the Scottish Enlightenment - which became a thirty-year-long quest to piece together the fragmentary evidence of his complex life into a coherent story of the contradictions within his personal, intellectual and business activities - has given us the first major study of a fascinating man, shown as having changed the nature of Scottish culture.    
    Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll and 1st Earl of Ilay, lived a long and very active life as soldier, lawyer, politician, patron and businessman. History remembers him on the one-hand as courageous, good-natured, learned and accomplished - and, on the other, as 'a man of little truth, little honour, little principle'. His substantial political career, driven by gaining and increasing his power and that of his friends, is poorly documented, since many of his private papers have vanished. The author's interest in Argyll as a key figure in the Scottish Enlightenment - which became a thirty-year-long quest to piece together the fragmentary evidence of his complex life into a coherent story of the contradictions within his personal, intellectual and business activities - has given us the first major study of a fascinating man, shown as having changed the nature of Scottish culture.    
    The first edition of Scottish Literature's Debt to Italy<    
    i> was commissioned by the Edinburgh Italian Cultural Institute and published by Edinburgh University Press in 1986. It was designed as a shortened version of the author's earlier monograph, The Italian Influence on Scottish Literature<    
    i> (Edinburgh University Press, 1972). A more selective approach and further research meant that the chronological period shared by both texts - from Henryson to the Nineteenth Century - was more incisively and more authoritatively presented in the shorter book. The studies of John Stewart in the 16th century and Sir Thomas Urquhart of Cromarty in the 17th benefited particularly from the gap in time and preparation as did the discussions on Walter Scott and Tobias Smollett. Additions within and beyond that period were also introduced, Byron is an example of the first category while studies of modern writers including Edwin Morgan, Robert Garioch, Muriel Spark and Victor Carin carry the survey of literary links between Scotland and Italy into the modern period. The present edition is published in recognition of the book's continued popularity at a time when Scottish critics are beginning to look outwards in a freer, less nationalistically defensive manner than in the past. As Italian scholars, including Marco Fazzini and Alessandra Petrina, have mirrored this enthusiasm, the Italian-Scottish comparative line has become especially strong. In order to retain the original unity of structure, the second edition retains the chronological remit of the first but does reflect and react to topics where the author's subsequent research has altered his view (e.g. translation) or where the arguments of others have disproved his earlier argument (e.g. William Fowler and patronage). In these ways, it is hoped that the new edition will continue to meet the need for an overview of the topic while recognizing the advances made in the interim.

R D S Jack, F.R.S.E., F.E.A. is Emeritus Professor of Mediaeval and Scottish Literature at Edinburgh University. His earlier books include <

   
    i>Scottish Prose 1550-1700 (1972); <    
    i>The Italian Influence on Scottish Literature (1972); <    
    i>Scottish Verse 1560-1660 (1978); <    
    i>Alexander Montgomerie (1985); <    
    i>History of Scottish Literature Vol 1 (1988); <    
    i>Patterns of Divine Comedy (1989); <    
    i>William Dunbar (1996),<    
    i> The Mercat Anthology of Early Scottish Literature (2000, with P.A.T. Rozendaal) and <    
    i>Scotland in Europe (2006, with Tom Hubbard). In 2010, the 150th anniversary of Barrie's birth, a reprint has appeared, from humming earth, of <    
    i>The Road to the Never Land.    
    'In the later twentieth century Robert Burns was sorely in need of commentators to provide fuller analysis of a figure whose cultural reputation too often overshadowed his literary achievement. The brilliance of David Daiches as a literary critic filled much of the gap. His readings are a cornerstone of modern Burns studies.' - Gerry Carruthers, Director, Centre for Robert Burns Studies, University of Glasgow.

An Edinburgh graduate in the 1930s, the early part of David Daiches' long and distinguished academic career was spent in the United States. However, after spells at Chicago and Cornell Universities, in 1951 he returned to Cambridge as a Lecturer in English. Ten years later he chose to leave Cambridge for the new University of Sussex where he was the first Professor and Dean in the School of English Studies. Retiring in 1977, he returned to Edinburgh where he continued to play an exceptionally active role in Scotland's intellectual and cultural life until his death in 2005. A polymath of English letters, Daiches' scholarly interests ranged extremely widely, but in no field is his influence more creative and enduring than in that of Scottish Literature. Our understanding of Scotland's literary culture in the eighteenth century, of Burns, of Scott, of Stevenson and McDiarmid, was transformed by his work. Originally published in 1951, his Robert Burns is a brilliant example of his ground-breaking scholarship and criticism at its most illuminating.<

   
    i>    
    Esther Warden was the 'terror' of West End Fremantle and the most dangerous woman in Western Australia. Lilly Doyle kept company with thieves and rogues and was listed as an 'undesirable'. May Ahern was a 'fallen' woman who lured men into dark street corners, tempting them away from the paths of virtue. Esther, Lilly and May were notorious female criminals in early twentieth-century Perth and Fremantle. Criminalised as drunks, prostitutes and vagrants, women committing offences against good order faced a double punishment for their social and gender transgressions. 'Drunks, Pests and Harlots' takes a trip through the underworld streets of Perth and Fremantle from 1900-1939. It offers a glimpse into the lives of criminal women facing close police surveillance, negative media coverage, strict incarceration and institutionalisation. These lives present historical perspectives on female offenders and the development of public critiques of women who fail to meet the expectations of society.

Leigh Straw is a Perth-based historian and historical fiction writer. She is a Lecturer in History at Edith Cowan University, Western Australia<

   
    i>.    
    In the months following the assassination of his brother, President John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy struggled to find meaning in a world that no longer made sense.For the first time in his life, he had to make a choice about what he wanted to do and what kind of public figure he would be. In the midst of his grief, he discovered the wisdom of the ancient Greeks and French-Algerian philosopher, Albert Camus. At poignant moments in his major speeches from 1964-1968 Robert Kennedy used passages from the Greeks and Camus to express himself and inspire his audiences. This passion for reading allowed Kennedy to intellectualise his public identity and communicate in a raw, honest way. Influenced by the Greeks and Camus, RFK's last years represent a new consciousness about the world around him. This book details the words of wisdom that inspired Robert Kennedy and allowed him to leave his own legacy in words.

Leigh Straw lectures in History at Edith Cowan University, Western Australia. She specialises in Ancient Greek and Roman, Modern American, and Australian history. Leigh has published in Scottish-Australian history and is currently researching the lives of criminal women in Perth and Fremantle. .

   
Darlington Hoopes: The Political Biography of an American Socialist Henderson, J. Paul 1846220017 £14.95 $27.95
Social Justice, Human Rights and Public Policy McLachlan, Hugh V. 1846220033 £14.95 $27.95
From the Womb to the Tomb: Issues in Medical Ethics McLachlan, Hugh V. and Swales, J.Kim 1846220114 £14.95 $27.95
Partnership out of Conflict Alexandrou, Alex 1846220130 £14.95 $28.95
Robert Penn Warren: A Vision Earned Walker, Marshall. Illustrated by the author 1846220157 £14.95 $24.95
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